Recidivism and Traumatic Brain Injury: A Vicious Cycle

Calls for criminal justice reform ring loud in Colorado. Overburdening of the corrections system is a part of the problem, driven in large part by the state’s
rate of recidivism. Half of people convicted of crimes in Colorado return to the criminal justice system within three years.

Seeking a deeper understanding of the issue, researchers at the University of Denver partnered with the Colorado Division of Probation Services. Their study examined the significant link between recidivism and traumatic brain injury (TBI).

many hands pushing on a log

Reducing Youth Recidivism with Multisystemic Therapy in Underserved Communities

Roughly one third of Colorado youth who spend at least a day in secure detention each year live in communities without a licensed MST provider. MST is an intensive home-based intervention for youth ages 12-17 whose behaviors put them at high risk for juvenile justice involvement and/or have problems with substance abuse. This pilot project evaluates the impact of the MST expansion on youth recidivism in eight Colorado counties.

Potential Health Care Cost Savings of Dual-Enrollment in Medicaid and SNAP

Colorado ranks among the lowest in the nation in terms of the percentage of the population receiving benefits from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) with about 60% of eligible residents participating. This study examines the impact of SNAP enrollment on healthcare costs–particularly emergency room visits and hospitalizations–among Colorado residents enrolled in Medicaid. If the study identifies substantial cost savings, it will provide a fiscal reason for increasing enrollment in SNAP among those who are eligible.