Concurrent Enrollment: A Pathway to Success

As the nation celebrates the class of 2020 and the resilience of graduates during a worldwide pandemic, it can be easy to forget that some students face huge challenges to high school graduation even in “normal” times. Living in foster care can make school feel like a perpetual marathon. In Jefferson County, a program called Fostering Opportunities helps them cross the finish line.

Critical Data Ensures Child Care for Essential Workers

In the early days of the pandemic, many child care centers and other educational institutions temporarily shut down, while essential workers, particularly in the health care industry, desperately needed care for their own children. Countless early childhood educators lost their jobs in the closures, yet centers that remained open to care for the children of essential workers faced significant staff shortages. But how to fill these diverse and dispersed needs, especially during a public health crisis?

Fostering Opportunities: Stories of Success

As the nation celebrates the class of 2020 and the resilience of graduates during a worldwide pandemic, it can be easy to forget that some students face huge challenges to high school graduation even in “normal” times. Living in foster care can make school feel like a perpetual marathon. In Jefferson County, a program called Fostering Opportunities helps them cross the finish line.

Does the Concurrent Enrollment Program Improve Time-To-Degree and Wages?

This study is an extension of the Outcomes and Return on Investment of Concurrent Enrollment in Colorado project and addresses the concern that while nearly 75% of jobs in Colorado require some education beyond high school, only 66% of the state’s adult population has such qualifications. Using administrative data from state education agencies, this study informs the state’s understanding of the Concurrent Enrollment program as a driver of on-time credential completion (Associate’s or Bachelor’s degrees) and increased earnings.

Improving Data Systems to Support the Early Childhood Workforce

There are roughly 19,000 members of the early childhood teaching workforce in Colorado. After families, this workforce is one of the most important and essential components to the development of children. This project develops and makes available meaningful data assets on the early childhood workforce so we can make data informed decisions on how best to support those caring for Colorado’s young children.